About

Hi, my name is Dan Lamppa. I live in the outskirts of St Paul, Minnesota on a small hobby farm. I’m married with two teenage kids. We have a terrier, a chihuahua, a barn cat (who retired to the basement) and a house rabbit.

I’ve been a software developer for 21 years. I’m fascinated by computers and their potential to enhance human life.

I’ve focused my work on smartphone development since 2008 (and later tablet development). My position as Mobile Technology Lead at RBA, Inc encourages me to learn as much as I can about mobile technology. I’ll use this blog to store and communicate what I’ve learned. I value your feedback.

My Computers, Phones & Tablets

I use both a Windows PC and a Mac for software development. I’ve used Unix and Linux very little and would enjoy more exposure to these operating systems.

My first smartphone was the original Motorola Droid. I stood at the front of the line 30 minutes before the cellular store in my small town opened. The guy that unlocked the door wondered why I was waiting there (I was the only one). I’d been anticipating the release of the Motorola Droid for months. It was the first phone with Android 2.0 which I thought had huge potential. I figured there would be a line like there had been for the iPhone.

In 2011 I upgraded to the HTC Thunderbolt (running Android 2.3.4). I would have gone with the iPhone 4 (after looking forward to its release on Verizon’s network for over a year) but the screen of the iPhone 4 seemed too small. I think this was from getting used to the large screen of the iPad.

With 5 months before my next phone upgrade, I flipped the Thunderbolt out of its holster and dropped it on the floor of a convenient store checkout. The battery cover flew off and little parts scattered out. Luckily I was able to put it all back together. The phone worked fine except the power/wake button did not work. Unfortunately this button is an essential function of a phone and I found myself needing a new phone. My wife had recently upgraded to the iPhone 5 leaving her old iPhone 4 available. I got my chance to use the iPhone 4 after all. I used it for 5 months until my next upgrade. I bought the Samsung Galaxy S4 in May of 2013.

In November 2014 I switched myself and my family from Verizon to T-Mobile. My wife and kids got iPhone 6’s and I got the iPhone 6 plus. The iPhone finally came with a screen large enough for my fingers to use comfortably.

I would not have considered buying an iPad until I was given one to use. A client lent me an original iPad for testing for a few months. When it was time to return it, I realized I could not go without one. I used it nearly every day for reading books, browsing the web and watching videos. I joked that it was my blankie since I carried it around everywhere.

The iPad 2 came out around the time I returned the borrowed iPad. I called Apple stores every morning for a few days until I found a store that had a black, 16gig, iPad 2, Wi-Fi Only in stock. I promptly purchased it.

Once I upgraded to the Galaxy S4 and even more so the iPhone 6 plus, I’ve found that I rarely use the iPad anymore. The size of the larger phones are adequate for reading and I find the iPad 2 a bit heavy. In fact I fell asleep while reading my iPad 2 in bed, dropped it and split my forehead open! I think the iPad Mini is a better form factor for me – maybe with padded edges just in case.

About This Blog

This blog is built with WordPress and is hosted at BlueHost. I am using the Genesis Theme Framework with one of the default sub-themes.

Comments

  1. 5 Options for Distributing Your iOS App to a Limited Audience (Legally)

    Apple Enterprise is for Employees only. May be logically for contractors as they are contract employees!

    Definitely not for Customers or other Business Partners like Vendors.

    Kindly clarify your inclusion of “Customers”

    Regards
    -Jayanta

    • Thanks for your question.

      The following text:

      “Internal Use Applications developed under [the Apple Enterprise Agreement] may be deployed on Deployment Devices in two ways: (1) deployment for internal use by Employees, and (2) deployment for use by Customers either on Your physical premises or under the direct supervision and physical control of Your Employees in other locations, subject to Apple’s right to review and approve such deployment as set forth herein”

      …is from the iOS Enterprise Distribution License Agreement that I found on another’s blog post. I am attempting to verify it with Apple. I updated my post with a note stating that.

  2. Dan, you mentioned TestFlight on a recent post. Can it be used to run a beta release pilot with a large base of user testers ( not part of the development team). Want to distribute app and test with a couple hundred people. If not, what is best option?

    Thanks

    Marcelo
    Oxford ( the original one, UK)

    • Great question. I have not needed to figure that out yet so I don’t know.

      I asked Testflight support and they replied: “Since TestFlight follows Apple’s beta distribution guidelines, your ad hoc distributed apps can only have as many testers as Apple specifies, which is typically 100. TestFlight teams can supported an unlimited number of members in case Apple’s guidelines change or in case you use different developer profiles for different apps with the same team.”

      I understand that Testflight does not enable you to get around Apple licensing contraints in any way other than you could do without Testflight.

      Technically you could use the Enterprise License to accomplish this but I cannot say that this is in keeping with the Enterprise license agreement.

  3. Your article “5 Options for Distributing your App” was really helpful. I am selling a B2B solution to companies. If i go with option 3), does apple care if i charge my customers “outside of their garden”. In other words, the price of the app in the business store will be $0, but I will be charging my customer monthly maintenence as well as per user/per month charges.

  4. Jim Shellhaas says:

    If we have a SaaS application that exchanges information with a B2B application on an i-phone or tablet, would there be a sales/distribution fee to Apple? The mobile app adds value to the SaaS solution, but could carry a $0 price tag — i.e., pricing included with the SaaS offering. There would at some point need to be user authentification

  5. Dear Dan, we are an mobile solution provider from Switherland http://www.appswithlove.com Because we didn’t like the rather complicated approach from Testflight we’ve developed an app delivery service ourselves. The main difference is that after an initial setup you can build and deploy an app even on the go via app. This is very usefulfor our project managers who do not have theskills required to build an app on testflight. Our Serviceis called “Updraft” and the websiteis: http://www.getupdraft.com. A short presentation you’ll find here: http://www.slideshare.net/Appswithlove/updraft-mobile-app-delivery

    We are currently investing lots into ux improvement, role&testuser-management, analytics, and android deployment as well as direct upload to app stores and a connection to Xamarin. This will happen until July 2015, however we and quite many otherdevs are using the service already.

    My question to u is if you may add this service to your already provided app delivery tools in your great blog post. Additionally I wonder if you know people who would be interested to try out and perhaps review this service?

    Kind Regards, Michael

  6. Elizabeth van de Helm says:

    Hey Dan,

    Thanks so much for your blog “5 Options for Distributing Your iOS App to a Limited Audience”. I came across it as I was looking for ways to use promocodes in a B2B setting (as some other readers seem to wonder about too).

    Do you happen to know if you could put an app in an App store, charge consumers a certain price, and give your B2B customers all individual codes? (So that the employer pays a lump sum for all its employees outside of the App Store?). It seems like both Apple and Android limit the number of promo codes you can use, but what if you’d need more? Any help or suggestions to where I could find more info are greatly appreciated.

    Thanks so much!

    Elizabeth

Leave a Reply